Tae Spears - Night Cap (Video Submission)

Today’s submission is from the talented Tae Spears and when y’all hear this...whew chile...can we say relatable?!

Tae Spears has created a beautiful introspective story in his latest video titled "Night Cap." This is a great display of romance and lust with clear vivid imagery, soft sensual lighting and a close visual of Tae and his main character played to be his wife. Coupled with lyrics that flow through a male's internal rationale of losing the one he loved through his own bad decision making. How many fellas can relate?

All in all, this video is definitely one with amazing replay value, thanks to the combo of Tae Spears and Damien Blue.

The production of this video is top notch and really proves how hard Milwaukee goes in the music scene. Keep up the great work because you got us all watching.  *prayer hands emoji*

#SupportYourOwn

#NoCap lol

/CW

Snapshot Press Release: "Power to the People" Interview w/ Emory Douglas

“A picture is worth a thousand words but action is supreme.” - Emory Douglas

Emory Douglas, visual Revolutionary Artist and Black Panther Party icon, made his way to Milwaukee’s UWM campus Peck School of the Arts, on October 24th, to give a presentation on his extensive collection of socially critical imagery. His work within the Black Panther Party and his contribution to history have made his presence an exciting catalyst to the social narrative in which we have been discussing. CopyWrite magazine was asked by AIGA-Wisconsin and UWM to sit down with Emory, to get his take on his #SociallyResponsible artistic quest and all the other things that spread between the lines of his symbolism.

CW: “For all intents and purposes, you were the artist that drew all the images in The Black Panther newspaper?”

ED: “Ninety-nine percent. There were others who contributed but it was my responsibility to show them how to put social justice content into the artwork.”

Though we know Emory as the man behind the art, his contribution to history had to start off understanding not only the image but the purpose behind it.

ED: “Well that became my role when I . . . I would have to initially start when I was in the Black Arts Movement, transitioning into the Black Panther Party. I was attending City College of San Francisco and I was beginning to take up Commercial Art. That showed you production skills as opposed to Fine Art . . . You learn figure drawing, the printing process, design elements, all those things. While there, I was a part of the Black Arts Movement. I was also there as the Black Conscious Movement was coming about, where we began to define ourselves as Afro-American and Black opposed to being defined as Negro.”

Trying to figure out what he could do at the time to help the movement, he had been told that there was a meeting taking place where they were planning the visit of Malcolm X widow, Betty Shabazz, to the Bay Area. Emory was also asked to do a poster of Shabazz. When he went to the meeting they would also discuss security for that event. The men who would agree to be that security would soon after, change his life.

ED: “When they came, it was Huey Newton and Bobby Seale. It was after that meeting I asked them how I could join and they gave me a card . . . I eventually started calling Huey and I would catch the bus and go by his house. He would show me around the neighborhood and introduce me to folks. Then we would go by Bobby Seale’s house.”

He noted that this was all happening around early January into late February 1967. Only a few months after the initial start of the Black Panther Party in October of 1966.

Fast forwarding, Emory recalled the first issue of The Black Panther News Paper being on legal size paper, done with a typewriter, and markers. It was the editorial project of Bobby and another member known as, Elbert “Big Man” Howard. Emory noticed them working on the leaflet while convening at the Black House, where cultural events took place, and creatives like Sonia Sanchez and Ed Bullins would hang. Interesting enough, Eldridge Cleaver, who became the party’s Minister of Information, lived upstairs from the Black House and would be drafted over to help with its planning with his comprehensive writing skills.

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ED: “One evening I went over there, nothing really was happening but Bobby, Huey, and Eldridge were downstairs. I saw them working on that first leaflet and I told them that maybe I could help them improve it. So I went and got my materials. I walked home and walked back, so it took me about an hour. When I got back they said, ‘Well we are finished with that. But you have been hanging around and you seem committed. We are going to start this paper and we want you to be the Revolutionary Artist.’ So that became my initial title. My job would be to tell our story from our perspective.”

And so it began. Emory would create the first tabloid paper for the Party from the content pressed at the Sacramento legislative meeting to change the de facto gun laws, that would affect The Panthers legal use. Setting the standard for The Black Panther Newspaper that would carry on until Fall of 1980, Emory’s art would become the visual rhetoric for a cultural movement we still dote on till this day. He would even be responsible for the visual interpretation of the Police as the “Pig”.

CW: “The first time you drew the pig was that the first time that it was projected in that way towards the police?”

ED: “It had been defined like that by Huey and Bobby. But when they asked me to do the pig drawing that was the first time [it appeared in that way] . . . there was a book from maybe 100 years or so ago that somebody had that defined the pig like that . . .”

CW: “As some type of authoritative figure?”

ED: “Yes.”

Huey had original requested Emory use a clipping of a pig on all four hooves, with a police badge number of those cops who were behaving as bad actors in the community every week.

 Emory & Lexi (Editor-in-Chief)

Emory & Lexi (Editor-in-Chief)

ED: “Then it just came to me one day, ‘Why don't I just stand it up on two hooves?’ ”

CW: “Oh yeah? Like how it really looks?”

Emory lit up in laughter.

ED: “Haaaaaaaaaaaa, Yea. With the flies and everything. Then it really took on a life of its own. It became an iconic symbol that transcended the African American community. It became a universal symbol.”

CW: “Now everyone is calling them the pigs!”

He chuckled softly with a glimmer in his eye. As comical as the image was, and still is, it holds a weight that is the stringent representation of the unhuman like disposition the legal forces of our country has displayed against the disenfranchised. Though creativity comes in many forms, Emory had no clue his social expression would become such a major part of revolutionary rhetoric.

Now let's be clear, the times in which Emory made his mark were times of civil unrest, political and social scrutiny, and homefront combat. It was risky. There was bloodshed and unfortunately, there were lives lost. Enduring these times takes strength, not only physically, but mentally and emotionally.

ED: “People had all kind of issues that came together, to deal with the social injustices that existed. So whatever it was that you had when you came into the party, you brought that baggage with you. We had to respond to those problems the best we could.”

But it was his next comment that dropped down on the room. Just as deep as his art could display, so would his words cut:

“You could say people were psychologically already messed up from colonization.”

Well, then . . . no argument here.

Discussing today's realities versus the past, Emory believes that today’s issues are even more trying. He marks the dynamics that generations face now are layered with environmental plight (global warming or not, polar caps are melting), corporate exploitation/investment in culture (representation is being marketed as gatekeepers to our communities authenticity), political friction (we are closer to nuclear war than ever before), and social dysfunction (police brutality is still alive and well).

ED: “As much as things change. Somethings stay the same.”

As an artist his opinions on purpose and meaning are strong. The messages that his art and many others’ creativity display are not isolated depictions, but should and have transcended cultures, classes, and even the disciplines in which they are created.

ED: “The message comes from listening to the people . . . Hearing what they are saying and their concerns, as well as your own concerns integrating, comes out in the artwork. I mean you had older Black middle-class brothers and sisters identifying with the Pig drawing just as much as you did with the people out in the streets.”

He argues that his aesthetic as an artist grew out of the awareness that needed to be displayed during that time. When questioned about the importance of visual art as a form of protest, from the time of his very controversial symbolism with the Black Panther’s till now, he reminded us that the context of his art came out of an organization backing a movement. It was not his voice alone. It was not the Black Panther Party versus the world. It was the system against the people.

images provided by: AIGA, www. journalstar.com, www.openculture.com , www.chicagoreader.com, and www.artnau.com

“We were like the nucleus or a spec of dust with a great impact. We inspired.”

CW: “Do you think without the Black Panther Party you would be the artist you are today?”

ED: “In some ways maybe, but not completely as I have developed. Because it's not only just the artwork itself but it's the collective environments. It's the criticizing and evaluation of the work and how you’ve done it. Sometimes it's in a casual way and other times it's in a real critical way.”

After the dis-assemblement of the Black Panther Party, Emory started working for the Black Press, creating imagery for their publication. Today he travels, collaborating with artist around the world to promote and produce socially conscious art that speaks on real-world issues. His mediums have even advanced beyond the production processes he learned in college so long ago, including the use of photoshop which he finds quite useful in the remixing his old compositions and his new wave artistic critic of the free world.

Throughout his lecture Emory commented on his art, its meaning, and his legacy, inspiring the room with his unyielding views. Regardless of if you agree with Emory’s position or not, his story is a reminder of the power of creativity, the communal service that can be a calling for an artist, and the impact a unified voice can make.

As we step forward in our purpose we must not forget that the revolution we call on is not a new one but the rebirth of its kind.

POWER TO THE PEOPLE.

Lexi for /CW

See This Post in Snap Press Release Here










Clear Pioneer - What I Already Am

The new era of Indie Pop is here with the Milwaukee music group Clear Pioneer! The members, Grant Clementi, Jesse Carl, and Kyler Schmor, have made their way on our radars since winning multiple talent showcases in 2018.

“Mastered by Timothy Wolf of Four Giants Studio (N43 records), their new single “What I Already Am” plays on the theme of 1980’s synthwave with a modern pop twist. The driving rhythm section, paired with haunting synths, paint a soothing backdrop for a familiar and tumultuous narrative.”

The video for “What I Already Am,” filmed and directed by Julian Valentine, welcomes fans to the band's refreshingly dark alternative universe; hypnotic lighting and colors draw the viewer in to this new, mysterious world.

If you don’t know them yet, you’re going to want to because they are on the rise. You feel me? #youfeelme.

Check out their website here for more information: http://www.clearpioneer.com/

And follow them on their social media! Instagram and Twitter: @clearpioneer

/CW



Dirty Thoughts - Check!

Do it with passion or not at all!

October has been crazy in all the right ways. . . remember how I said last months word was balance? Well this months word was clarity.

Things have really been starting clear themselves up and that “good stress” has been leaving me with opportunities that only action make possible.

So to where this month is too hectic to give a in-depth Dirty Thoughts, I’ll just do some soft stunting over here in my bubble.

Check this:

  • Interviewed a famous Artist and member of the Black Panther Party (Check! My father would be so proud.)

  • Sponsored and moderated a live interview with a Grammy award winner & label exec (Check! This is the moment I realized that I really have a cool job.)

  • Went back blonde (Check! Ya girl is back.)

  • Made ya look! (Check!!!!!!!!! Nope I haven’t fallen off yet! Thanks for asking lol)

So the reminder here is to do cool things because they make you feel alive, all the other things will fall into place. I have a contract to write up, a new hire to train…so ummmm gota go!

But How Chance would say it: “I’m Livin’ my best Life. Its my birthday...or least that's what I’m dressed like”. Or at least trying too!

/Dirty



Kaylon Raps - Solitary

Today’s submission was sent in by Kaylon Raps! At CopyWrite, we want artists to be able to communicate their creative message the way they want it to be received. Music is always up for interpretation, however for this review, there was no better way to introduce you to Kaylon than to let his words speak for himself. Vibe out! ✌🏽

“Sometimes we don’t realize what we have until it’s gone. Solitary is a song that describes the struggle between our natural ability to Love, yet the rejection of that same Love. An endless battle within oneself until something valuable is lost. It's only then do we feel the regret.  

Solitary is available on all streaming platforms and will be featured on Kaylon's upcoming debut EP entitled "Everything In Between", which is set to be released on October 23rd, 2018.  

Milwaukee-native, Kaylon Raps, aims to move a culture with paradigm shifting messages to excite and inspire the listener's ear. His journey towards reshaping the identity of a culture through music began when he was 21. Kaylon crafted his first mixtape in the Fall of 2012 (Despite Opposition Vol. 1), followed by the release of Despite Opposition Vol 2, in December of 2014, known most notably for the track “Jesus Piece” which gained over 25 thousand listens when featured by Rapzilla, showing early on, that Kaylon was an MC to be reckoned with.

The transformation of his music over the years has been evident. Treating each project like the pages of a diary, Kaylon’s music reflects his deepest personal experiences; the very experiences that have helped to shape his unique sound. This unique sound is both familiar and distinctive—greatly influenced by classic hip hop, jazz and the gospel melodies of his youth.”

/CW



You are NOT Alone - Domestic Violence Awareness Month

One of our Locals pointed out to us that as a women owned business it is important to be vocal about where we stand on largely female impacting issues. With that being said, as October is also Domestic Violence Awareness month we want to make sure that we project the importance of self love, self care, and open communication on the negatives that impact us…

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS AN ISSUE.

WE STAND WITH THE FIGHT TO END DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN OUR COMMUNITY.


* Information provided by Milwaukee Health Department *


What is Domestic Violence?

Domestic violence is the use of a pattern of abuse to maintain power and control in a familiar relationship. Abuse affects all populations, regardless of their age, race, sex, nationality, religion, ability, socioeconomic status, gender identity, or sexual orientation.

(That means it can happen to any of us!)

What is considered abusive behavior?

Abusive behaviors may include:

  • Physical Abuse: Use of physical force in a way that injures or puts others at risk of injury

  • Emotional Abuse: Use of words, tone, actions, or lack of action meant to control, hurt, or demean

  • Sexual Abuse: Forced or coerced sexual act or behavior motivated to acquire power and control

  • Financial Abuse: Use or misuse of financial or monetary resources of the partner or of the partnership without the partner’s freely given consent

  • Spiritual Abuse: Using victim’s religious or spiritual beliefs to manipulate

  • Identity Abuse: Using personal characteristics to demean, manipulate, and control partner; comprised of “isms” around race, gender, sex, age, sexual orientation, etc.

(How do we use our power? To help or to cause harm?)

Why don't victims leave?

The decision to leave an abusive relationship is difficult, and a victim's reasons for staying may be numerous, including:

  • Fear of physical harm, retaliation, dealing with the legal system, or changing their situation

  • Love for their significant other

  • Lack of resources (housing, money, accessible programs)

  • Isolation from supportive friends and family members

  • Familial pressure

  • Normalization of violence in the relationship

  • A sense of guilt or responsibility for the abuse

  • A desire to help their abuser

  • Potential public shaming or humiliation

  • Optimism that things will change

  • Religious belief and values

(Individual issues have individual outcomes, non-judgmental support is key.)

If you want to help us create awareness tag us in your 20 second video on instagram or Facebook (@copywritemag) video to let us know why you stand against Domestic Violence. (Email that video to copywrite.mke@gmail.com to be apart of our #SociallyResponsible 2019 campaign video).


Your voice matters!

Click Here for a list of local resources that can help if you or someone you love is being abused.

/CW

Fashion Friday - Locally Fresh 2018 Pop Up Vendor and Fashion Showcase (Fall)

Did somebody say Friday??? Better yet, Fashion Friday!? Cheers to the weekend Milwaukee! 

“I can’t believe we made it! This is what we thankful for!” -The Carters 


In case you missed it, I want to take you all back to last weekend. Last Sunday was the “Locally Fresh 2018 Pop Up Vendor and Fashion Showcase” hosted by The Classic Shoppe & Fresh Bucks Custom Designs (& of course sponsored in part by CopyWrite Magazine). This event was the perfect setting for local designers to show us what they have available and overall I was quite pleased! Ranging from kids to extended sizes, the fashion show debuted everything from graphic tees, to tracksuits to scarves and leg warmers. With winter approaching quickly, these entrepreneurs brought the heat to the Astor Hotel ballroom! 

(It was definitely an upgrade from the last show, and the local love was real).

 Tracksuits by No Fingerprints clothing ( @nofingerprints_lp )

Tracksuits by No Fingerprints clothing (@nofingerprints_lp)

  Look by Distinctive Designs by Tomira ( @myddbt )


Look by Distinctive Designs by Tomira (@myddbt)

Special thank you to The Classic Shoppe for having us and shout out to all the brands that came out!

Check them out and grab some local merch via Instagram: 
@theclassicshoppe
@amp_creations
@utbs_llc
@myddbt
@madlove_llc
 @nofingerprints_lp
@freshbuckscustomdesign
@iamjriley


/Jacob


#WeAreMKEHipHop - The Elements Podcast x CopyWrite Magazine

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A word from our partners:

We at The Elements Podcast are honored to announce our new partnership with CopyWrite Mag. Through hard work and a commitment to Milwaukee's Hip Hop scene together we will be able to make big things happen for Hip Hop and for Milwaukee.

-DUB, Founder of The Elements: A Hip-Hop Podcast




As we continue to support the local we will now be vocal in our partnerships to further connections in our community and to bring light to the real bonds that have elevated the Urban creative scene in MKE. We are MKE Hip-Hop!

/CW

Dom’ McNeal - Lake Drive (video submission)

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“Dom McNeal is an up-and-coming hip-hop artist from Milwaukee who has a flow that really stands out and is hard to compare to anyone else. With summer vibes and being produced by Tyso Sprme and Deuce LB$, it’s definitely a project that’s opening ears.”

...and this song has us listening!

‘Lake Drive’ is the second track from McNeal’s latest project ‘SummertimeDOM’ and it’s a song we can all relate to -taking those summer drives to the lake with ya boo, just chillin’. But also the idea of us all having dreams and wanting the most out of life. The production of the song is smooth with melodic snares carefully placed within the beat for a nice soft touch.

And we can’t forget to mention the dope visuals of the downtown 414 skyline in the background.


Dom McNeal’s project is available on all streaming platforms, make sure you check it out!

/CW


#RespectTheDynasty - House Of Renji x CopyWrite Magazine

Housepartnership.jpg

A word from our partners:

In 2013, the House Of Renji was founded as a means to propel the careers of young creatives in the city of Milwaukee. During our 5 years of existence, growth and expansion CopyWrite Magazine has been there the entire way. 

Every step, every song, every tour, and every moment has been thoroughly documented and shared by the family we have in CopyWrite.

We’re pleased to announce our official partnership with CopyWrite Magazine in hopes that everyone will view this long term relationship as an inspiration and example of what is possible between not only companies, but people, who believe in the same ideals and have the same goals in mind. 

Here’s to everything urban, respect. 

- The House 


As we continue to support the local we will now be vocal in our partnerships to further connections in our community and to bring light to the real bonds that have elevated the Urban creative scene in MKE. If there were ever any doubts, let it be clear, The Dynasty Lives!

/CW